Lichen

Photo 2 Lichen_-_Still_2

Synopsis:

This stunningly bizarre short film explores the world of lichen, a species that confounds scientists to this day. Shot in macro 3D, Lichen offers us a look at this remarkable life form and asks what we might learn from it. Lichen will be part of a special Earth Day celebration on UM campus where the macro photography will loom large over Missoula in a celebration that spotlights even the tiniest living things on Earth.

 

Pop-up Earth Day Installation
On April 22 from 8-10 p.m.
, the UM Family and Missoula community members are invited to celebrate Earth Day and UM Wildlife Biology’s 85th Anniversary with a free pop-up film installation on the UM campus. IWFF, founded by UM faculty member Chuck Jonkel 44 years ago, will toast the number one Wildlife Biology Program in the nation by spotlighting the tiniest living things on Earth and seeing them larger than life.

This installation features the short film, Lichen by renowned filmmaker Lisa Jackson projected on the east wall of the Forestry building. The film will be accessible for people to view on foot every 15 minutes. Social distancing and masks will be required and this installation will happen rain or shine.

 

Finalist

  • Director: Lisa Jackson

  • Producers:

  • Janine Marchessault, Cydney Langill

  • Lichenologist: Trevor Goward

  • Duration: 11min 37sec

  • Category: New Vision

  • Canada

Available 4/24 - 5/15

Part of On Trees shorts block
with Under Review: Katahdin, Black Ram & My History of Trees

Pop Up Installation on 4/22 | 8-10 pm FREE
UM Wildlife Biology’s 85th Anniversary
Forestry Building, UM Campus
Click here for map.

Sponsored by

UM BIO Paw

In LICHEN, ward-winning Anishinaabe filmmaker Lisa Jackson reveals worlds within worlds that exist beyond the human senses on our planet. Though if you learn how to observe them, you will find lichens everywhere – they come in different shapes and sizes, and grow on surfaces (natural and constructed) all across the planet. Using powerful 3D macro lenses to photograph their “emergence,” Jackson's film takes us on a meditative journey into a plethora of surreal planetary ecologies. - Curator and Producer, Janine Marchessault